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Increases in the Minimum Wage in New York State and New York City

NY State and NYC governments have taken steps to implement minimum wage increases, which is positively impacting millions of employees, statewide!


Below, you will find information about what the minimum hourly wage is or will be, depending on the industry that the minimum wage worker is in, and the geographical region within NY State that the minimum wage worker works in.


FOR WORKERS IN THE FAST FOOD INDUSTRY


If you work within the fast food industry in the five boroughs of New York City, your minimum wage is $12.00, due to increase to $13.50 on December 31, 2017.


If you work within the fast food industry, outside New York City, your minimum wage is currently $10.75 and is due to increase to $11.75 on December 31, 2017.

FOR TIPPED WORKERS IN THE HOSPITALITY INDUSTRY – DECEMBER 31, 2016 TO DECEMBER 30, 2017

Your hourly wages and tip credits will depend on the industry you’re in (whether you are a service employee or food service employee), the size of your employer within the State of New York, and where your employer is located geographically.

See https://labor.ny.gov/formsdocs/factsheets/pdfs/p717.pdf/


FOR WORKERS IN ALL OTHER INDUSTRIES EXCEPT THE BUILDING SERVICE INDUSTRY (where tip credits are prohibited), FROM DECEMBER 31, 2016 TO DECEMBER 30, 2017

If you work for a New York City employer of 11 or more, you must receive a cash wage of $8.30 when tips are at least $2.70 per hour. You must receive a cash wage of $9.35 per hour when tips are at least $1.65 per hour but less than $2.70 per hour.

If you work for a New York City employer of 10 of fewer, you must receive a cash wage of $7.95 when tips are at least $2.55 per hour. You must receive a cash wage of $8.90 when tips are at least $1.60 but less than $2.55 per hour.

If you work for a New York City employer of any size in Long Island or Westchester County, you must receive a cash wage of $7.55 per hour when tips are at least $2.45 per hour. You must receive a cash wage of $8.50 when tips are at least $1.50 per hour but less than $2.45 per hour.

If you work for an employer of any size, within any area not mentioned above, you must receive a cash wage of $7.35 per hour when tips are at least $2.35 per hour. You must receive a cash wage of $8.25 when tips are at least $1.45 per hour, but less than $2.35 per hour.

Note that the future scheduled increases in New York State are not set in stone- the legislation provides a procedure to slow down the scheduled minimum wage increases if there’s a slowdown in the New York economy.

FOR WORKERS EMPLOYED BY THE STATE OF NEW YORK

In November 2015, Governor Cuomo announced that his administration is raising the minimum wage for state workers to $15.00 an hour, making New York the first state to enact a $15.00 public sector minimum wage.

FOR WORKERS EMPLOYED BY THE CITY OF NEW YORK

In January 2016, Mayor De Blasio announced a $15.00 minimum wage for all City government employees who provide contracted work for NYC at social service organizations. Under current contracts, wages are already ahead of the minimum wage increase that has been proposed in Albany. However, most contracts expire in 2017 or 2018. As per Mayor De Blasio, all employees will make $15.00 per hour, regardless of whether their contract expires beforehand.

Direct City Employees (school crossing guards, city seasonal aides, job training participants, and a number of other titles mostly represented by DC 37) will benefit from this wage increase by December 31, 2018.
Right now, they earn $12.14 per hour, and their will earn $13.50 per hour starting on December 31, 2017.

Purchase of service employees, i.e. those who do contracted work for NYC (teacher aids, custodial aides, family and infant care workers, for example), will see their wages increase as well.

Right now, they earn $12.00 per hour. On December 31, 2017, they will earn $13.50 per hour.

We’ll keep you posted of all other exciting developments concerning the NY and NYC minimum wage.

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